ENSO

Sea level rise in the Pacific
September 1, 2016

The Pacific Ocean has a significant influence on global mean surface temperature, as recently demonstrated during the 2015/16 El Niño. New research shows a new way to quantify the role of the Pacific Ocean using sea level information rather than traditional sea surface temperature data.

wind and temperature anomalies
May 18, 2016

New research shows how easterly winds in the summer of 2014 caused the anomalously warm subsurface water of the tropical Pacific—which presages an El Niño event and formed following the early 2014 westerly wind burst—to never discharge poleward, thereby remaining in the tropical Pacific and giving a head start to the developing 2015-16 El Niño.

Ground water levels over time
April 22, 2016

Many people were counting on the strong El Niño this winter to produce surplus water to recharge the groundwater and make up for what’s been pumped out due to the severe drought. However, a new study found that the groundwater level in California’s Central Valley has continued to decline even when drought has recovered.

ENSO and droughts and flooding
November 4, 2015

In the future, the Pacific Ocean's temperature cycles could disrupt more than just December fishing. Known collectively as the El Niño Southern Oscillation, or ENSO, the changing seasonal phenomena known as El Niño and La Niña could lead to at least a doubling of extreme droughts and floods in California later this century.

Coral reefs Guam
October 5, 2015

Over the coming decades, the tropical Pacific is likely to experience more extreme sea level swings on timescales of several years. The culprit is a change in the El Niño-Southern Oscillation and its characteristic Pacific wind response, according to a new study using CMIP5 climate change projections.

Pages

Subscribe to ENSO