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Webinars

Upcoming webinars are listed below and login details can be found in the calendar. 

Pathways Connecting Climate Changes to the Deep Ocean Webinar Series

This webinar series will set the stage for the Pathways Connecting Climate Changes to the Deep Ocean workshop and ignite preliminary conversations between observational oceanographers and modelers across physical, biogeochemical, and ecological communities. Through this webinar series and the workshop, we aim to develop recommendations for improved detection and attribution of change in the global deep ocean system.

Upcoming Webinars

Date:
Title: Which ocean variables and climate variables? The "recalcitrant" deep water mode correlates with surface processes, climate sensitivity, and thermosteric sea level rise
Presenter(s):

Baylor Fox-Kemper, Brown University

Join us for this double-header webinar to kick off the Pathways Connecting Climate Changes to the Deep Ocean webinar series!

Global thermosteric sea level rise can be estimated accurately with only a two-layer model for global mean thermosteric sea level (Palmer et al. (2018), IPCC AR6).  This same two-layer model can be used to infer the global energy budget (IPCC AR6) and as a basis for quantitatively accurate emulators built by our group. This simple model has a surface layer that is "active" in that it warms up quickly and a deep layer that is "recalcitrant" and exchanges energy on a slower timescale.  The emulator can assess parameter and process sensitivity: regional mixed layer depth is significantly correlated with the emulator model parameters.  Using Argo observations of mixed layer depths as an emergent constraint, the likely range of equilibrium climate sensitivity (ECS) for a CMIP6 model collection can be narrowed by 40%.  The emulator can also be hybridized with an extended Kalman filter, which makes it possible to use Argo and GMST data simultaneously to estimate the "climate state" of the earth and how it responds to potential future volcanism.

Date:
Title: Pathways for dense waters into the deep North Atlantic: lessons from OSNAP and OOI
Presenter(s):

Isabela Le Bras (WHOI)

Join us for this double-header webinar to kick off the Pathways Connecting Climate Changes to the Deep Ocean webinar series!

In the high-latitude North Atlantic, subtropical waters are transformed into the cold, fresh, carbon- and oxygen-rich waters that fill the deep ocean, where they are isolated from the atmosphere for hundreds to thousands of years. Understanding the processes which govern this subduction of waters into the deep ocean is key to quantifying the ocean's uptake of heat and carbon and understanding climate stability and variability on long time scales. In this talk, I highlight recent findings based the Overturning in the Subpolar North Atlantic Program (OSNAP) and Oceans Observatories Initiative (OOI) in the Irminger Sea that illuminate how deep waters go from formation sites to boundary currents and ultimately get exported into the deep North Atlantic. I also highlight recent efforts to add dissolved gas measurements to standard hydrographic and circulation observations in the subpolar North Atlantic to directly measure oxygen and carbon pathways into the deep ocean.

Date:
Title: Long-term abyssal time series and what they tell us about climate impacts on the deep sea
Presenter(s):

Henry Ruhl, Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute

Studies on the connections between climate variation and change to changes in the deep sea have revealed that the connections can be abrupt even though deep ocean mixing occurs at decadal to millennial scales. A key mechanism for shorter-term change has been shown to be variations in sinking particulate flux, i.e. marine snow. Effects have been understood through time series observations of changes in climate, ocean circulation, surface primary productivity, sinking particle flux, changes in seafloor fauna from microbes to fishes, respiration at the seabed, and ambient oxygen concentrations. While some aspects have been reliably observed, some mechanistic aspects remain poorly constrained. For example, the sinking particle flux rates are highly variable over a range of time scales from hourly to interannually, but the drivers in the most intense events vary in ways that have been challenging to bring into a unified theoretical construct. The talk will review some of the evidence to date and prospective ideas for resolving mechanisms of change.

Date:
Title: Biological and biogeochemical pathways of carbon into the deep sea: Lessons from the EXPORTS field campaigns
Presenter(s):

Amy Maas, Arizona State University-Bermuda Institute of Ocean Sciences

The NASA EXPORTS project brought together oceanographers across physical, biogeochemical, and ecological communities to quantify the pathways of carbon into the deep sea in two distinct ecosystems – the fall oligotrophic period in the North Pacific and the spring bloom in the North Atlantic. For this talk I will discuss EXPORTS synthesis projects I have contributed to that explore the relative contribution of animals (zooplankton and fish) to the flux of carbon to depth, and to the biological demand of the midwater. These collaborative projects highlight gaps in our observational datasets and indicate processes neglected in our model construction that must be filled if we are to address climate change implications for the deep ocean.

Phenomena, Observations, and Synthesis Webinar Series

This series will feature experts, with a focus on early career researchers, who are working on research topics of interest to the US CLIVAR Phenomena, Observations, and Synthesis (POS) Panel. The Panel's mission is to improve understanding of climate variations in the past, present, and future, and to develop syntheses of critical climate parameters while sustaining and improving the global climate observing system. The webinars are held on the first Monday of the month @ 1pm ET.

No webinars scheduled at this time.

Process Study Webinar Series

The Process Studies and Model Improvement Panel hosted webinar series aims to provide feedback to process studies. The goals of this webinar series are 1) to provide feedback on the plans and challenges for individual process studies and 2) to distill programmatic lessons from process studies and field campaigns to help current and future observational programs to effectively meet the broader goals of improving the understanding of physical processes in the ocean and the atmosphere and to translate this understanding into improved observational and modeling capabilities. The webinars are typically held on the fourth Tuesday of the month @ 2pm ET.

No webinars scheduled at this time.

Predictability, Predictions, and Applications Interface Webinar Series

This series features experts who are working on research topics of interest to the Predictability, Predictions, and Applications Interface (PPAI) Panel. The Panel's mission is to foster improved practices in the provision, validation and uses of climate information and forecasts through coordinated participation within the US and international climate science and applications communities. The Panel members act as facilitators, assisting in moving climate science forward. The webinars are held on the third Wednesday of the month @ 2pm ET.

No webinars scheduled at this time.