US Climate Variability and Predictability Program

Research Highlights

US CLIVAR aims to feature the latest research results from the community of scientists participating in our interagency-sponsored projects, working groups, panels, science teams, and workshops. Check out the collection of research highlights below and sort by topic on the right. 

Researchers found that atmospheric rivers that impact the West Coast contain more tropical moisture than average, indicating that long-distance transport of tropical moisture does occur.

Using both observations and simulations from multiple models, researchers show that most models underestimate the amplitude of low-frequency AMOC variability.

Regional model simulations suggest that post-1980 warming in both the ocean and atmosphere resulted in an estimated 20% increase of the accumulated precipitation for Hurricane Harvey.

An international team of scientists used six years of simultaneous moored observations with satellite winds to produce a new MOC volume transport record for 34.5°S in the South Atlantic Ocean.

Scientists have investigated differences between two arrays (at 16N and 26N) and found that both datasets show deep waters (below 1100 m) at the western boundary becoming fresher and less dense, but there remain discrepancies in the methods measuring ocean circulation.