Research Highlights

US CLIVAR aims to feature the latest research results from the community of scientists participating in our interagency-sponsored projects, working groups, panels, science teams, and workshops. Check out the collection of research highlights below and sort by topic on the right. 

An international team of scientists used six years of simultaneous moored observations with satellite winds to produce a new MOC volume transport record for 34.5°S in the South Atlantic Ocean.

Scientists have investigated differences between two arrays (at 16N and 26N) and found that both datasets show deep waters (below 1100 m) at the western boundary becoming fresher and less dense, but there remain discrepancies in the methods measuring ocean circulation.

Researchers conclude that changes in sensible heat transfer and evaporation fluxes — in response to strong regional trends in sea ice cover — are becoming increasingly consequential to Arctic climate variability and change.

ENSO experienced a regime shift in the late 1970s, after which events become stronger and less frequent. Researchers now conclude that the regime shift did not occur by chance but was due to a “real” change in the ENSO system.

Using satellite observations from 1982–2017, researchers found that SSTs and global atmospheric teleconnection patterns are significantly correlated to both the Antarctic and the Southern Oscillations.