Research Highlights

US CLIVAR aims to feature the latest research results from the community of scientists participating in our interagency-sponsored projects, working groups, panels, science teams, and workshops. Check out the collection of research highlights below and sort by topic on the right. 

ENSO experienced a regime shift in the late 1970s, after which events become stronger and less frequent. Researchers now conclude that the regime shift did not occur by chance but was due to a “real” change in the ENSO system.

Using satellite observations from 1982–2017, researchers found that SSTs and global atmospheric teleconnection patterns are significantly correlated to both the Antarctic and the Southern Oscillations.

Climate change will drive more frequent and extreme summer heat waves in the western US by late the 2020s, the Great Lakes region by the mid-2030s, and in the northern and southern Plains by the 2050s and 2070s, respectively.

Research shows that SST may explain a significantly smaller percentage of the variance in tropical cyclone intensification in the Atlantic as compared to the western North Pacific and eastern-central Pacific.

Researchers show that weakened surface ocean circulation coincides with precipitation during the Little Ice Age and is consistent with little-to-no changes in the larger Atlantic meridional overturning circulation.