News & Publications

Research Highlights

US CLIVAR aims to feature the latest research results from the community of scientists participating in our interagency-sponsored projects, working groups, panels, science teams, and workshops. Check out the collection of research highlights below and sort by topic on the right. 

Composite analysis of sea surface temperatures based on Atlantic Water temperature variability.
October 26, 2016

Research shows that decadal shifts of subsurface Atlantic Water temperatures, along the North Atlantic Current, are associated with a progression of heat anomalies from the Gulf Stream region that coincide with sea surface temperatures extending to cover most of the subpolar and tropical North Atlantic; a signal similar to that of the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation.

Fingerprint of Greenland ice melt and the contribution to global sea level rise
October 20, 2016

New research shows that even the longest and highest-quality tide gauge data may underestimate the amount of global average sea level rise that occurred during the 20th century, due to their limited location.

Indo-Pacific tropical rain belt expanded and contracted in the past
October 5, 2016

A new study using a high-resolution stalagmite record from Australia with cave sites in southern China reveal a close coupling of monsoon rainfall on both continents, with numerous synchronous pluvial and drought periods, suggesting that the tropical rain belt expanded and contracted numerous times at multidecadal to centennial scales.

El Nino events and tropical cyclones, models compared to observations
September 7, 2016

It is well known that ENSO strongly affects the interannual variability of tropical cyclones in the western North Pacific. New research shows that models can reproduce interannual variability, but none can capture the distinction between eastern Pacific and central Pacific El Niño events that is found in observations.

Sea level rise in the Pacific
September 1, 2016

The Pacific Ocean has a significant influence on global mean surface temperature, as recently demonstrated during the 2015/16 El Niño. New research shows a new way to quantify the role of the Pacific Ocean using sea level information rather than traditional sea surface temperature data.

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